Home Secretary Amber Rudd has unveiled a tool, which she claims, can detect extremist content and block it from view.

In an interview with the BBC, Rudd didn’t rule out making it compulsory for technology companies to use the tool.

The news comes as Rudd is in the US to meet with tech giants to discuss ways of working to collaboratively counteract the emergence of online extremist content.

The government invested £600,000 of public funds towards the creation of the tool – which has been reportedly trained to spot extremist material automatically –by London-based AI firm ASI Data Science.

ASI claims its proprietary software is able to detect the vast majority (94%) of Islamic State’s activity online – with a reported accuracy score of 99.995%.

While in the US, Rudd told the BBC: “It’s a very convincing example of the fact that you can have the information you need to make sure this material doesn’t go online in the first place.”

“The technology is there. There are tools out there that can do exactly what we’re asking for. For smaller companies, this could be ideal.

“We’re not going to rule out taking legislative action if we need to do it.

“But I remain convinced that the best way to take real action, to have the best outcomes, is to have an industry-led forum like the one we’ve got,” Rudd concluded.