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Photo by Yura Fresh on Unsplash

The iGaming industry has enjoyed explosive growth in the 25 years since its creation. It has thrived by providing convenient and exciting ways for its customers to bet on sports, play classic casino games, and wager modern video slots. And it has done this by embracing new technologies whenever they become available.

Throughout the 1990s and early 2000s, iGaming companies developed better and more engaging games by making use of increasing internet speeds and more powerful computers. This included adding sounds, animations, and making a more streamlined experience.

Online Casinos and More

Online casinos are some of the most popular iGaming sites. In the UK, more than 5 million bets are placed on slot games alone, with a similar number of wagers made on table and card games. However, they typically also offer other products like sports betting, poker, bingo, scratch cards, and virtual sports.

The online casino at betsafe.com is a great example of a modern iGaming website. It offers a range of different products including a live casino, sports betting, and poker.

Smartphones Disrupting the Market

Before Apple launched the iPhone in 2007, smartphones were clunky devices used by technology enthusiasts and some business people. They either ran Windows Mobile and required a stylus or Blackberry OS, which mostly used physical keyboards.

Few people considered the concept of playing games on these phones, partly because they were seen as business productivity devices.

This all changed though when Apple began allowing users to download and install new software from its App Store and games like Angry Birds and Fruit Ninja proved that gaming on these mobile devices was popular.

The iGaming industry quickly took note and began developing mobile apps that allowed their customers to play their games from anywhere. This proved to be immensely popular, and now most customers play from a mobile device at least some of the time.

The End of Flash

Before smartphones, Adobe Flash was ubiquitous on websites that included interactive elements. However, Apple refused to support the technology on its devices for security and stability reasons.

As a result, web designers were forced to adopt HTML5 which supported many of the interactive features natively in the browser.

While some online casinos did and still do use their own proprietary software that the customer must download to their computer, many have opted to switch to browser-based HTML5 games.

This means that the games will run on almost any device, providing almost universal support.

If it hadn’t been for Apple’s insistence on keeping Flash away from the iPhone and iPad and pushing developers to use HTML5 instead, the iGaming industry could still be using the technology today.

Betting in Play

It’s not just casinos that have seen disruption from mobile technology. Sportsbooks have embraced mobile devices to make it easier for their customers to bet on games while they’re live.

While they may not have a computer near their TV or while at a stadium, they do have a smartphone with them. This convenience has helped bookmakers to significantly increase the number of bets placed on sports like football and tennis.